WE EXPLORE BELOW DIFFERENT TYPES OF DRAWINGS

WE CAN USE DRAWINGS TO COMMUNICATE WHAT WE INTEND TO MAKE WITH INSTRUCTIONS AND DIMENSIONS.

WE CAN ALSO USE PRESENTATION DRAWINGS TO SHOW A PICTURE OF WHAT WE INTEND TO MAKE TO THOSE WHO DONT UNDERSTAND WORKING DRAWINGS.

PLANS are the most common form of communication within the building industry. The area required on the actual ground is displayed. The actual position of walls etc is determined.

Pictorial plans can be useful.

 

An ELEVATION is the most intuitive way to show an item. If you ask a young child to draw their room, they will usually draw in elevation without perspective - as did primitive man.

  • It is useful within the working drawing set as it shows heights.
  • It is also useful for client presentations
 

A SECTION is a ‘cut’ through a building, or item.

  • This shows more detail than an elevation section as it shows thickness of horizontal and vertical elements.
 
 

DETAILS of the structure are important as they enable the builder to see how the designer wants the components to be put together, and what the final result should be.

 

A PERSPECTIVE IS one form of presentation drawing - 3 Dimensional space conveyed on a 2 dimensional surface

Lines can converge to 1point, 2 points or 3 points

A PERSPECTIVE CAN BE ONE POINT  -  THE LINES GO TO ONE POINT

THE VERTICAL AND HORIZONTAL LINES ARE STRAIGHT

A 2 POINT PERSPECTIVE HAS THE LINES GOING TO 2 POINTS

THE MOST COMMON IS WHEN THE 3RD LINES ARE ALL VERTICAL -THIS IS THE MOST REALISTIC

A 3 POINT PERSPECTIVE HAS THE EYE LEVEL LOOKING DOWN OR UP FOR THE THIRD POINT

AN AXONOMETRIC DRAWING

Three sides of a 3D object can been seen in a 2D format.

Often using a 90 degree angle.

Elevation or plan oblique

  • Often called ‘axonometric”
  • Usually the front elevation or plan drawn at 90° - then lines drawn at 45° to indicate depth of the other view of the elevation. These lines are drawn to the actual length - they are not “eye” adjusted. All vertical lines are drawn perpendicular to the base line.
  • Traditionally this view is used to draw a cube.
 

AN ISOMETRIC

  • horizontal lines drawn at 30°, and 30°, to the actual length -
  • they are not eye adjusted.
  • All vertical lines are drawn perpendicular to the base line.